LORDS OF CHAOS Film Review by Gabrielle Lamontagne

Lords of Chaos Film Review
By Bri Lamontagne (DJ Bri)

This film seems like a very honest, autobiographical retelling of the life and times of the band Mayem – the first Norwegian Black Metal band. It was filmed in a documentary style, for the most part, though there’s a nice mix between voice over narration and scenes with dialogue.

Violence is a main theme, including suicide, arson, and torturous murder by multiple stabbings. As the physical violence escalates, the music aspect of the band and label’s inception seems to devolve, which makes sense since the leader and narrator seems uncomfortable with these acts, but still encourages them because they fit the brand he’s been creating. It started because he didn’t want to admit that the concept of people committing suicide due to love of his music was for the image of the band, but claimed it was truly what they wanted. As others began to show what violent crimes they were inspired to commit based on that original concept, he seems to become more uncomfortable, but doesn’t want to seem weak or attention-seeking, and so he continues to encourage the acts – though after the murder he did try to regain control by telling his “black circle” to “lay low”. Even so, he felt like he’d lost control of his group, his life, and his mission.

The film is extremely psychologically dark, though there’s a little friendship and romance tossed in (which I’m sure was accurate to the story, as well). The film even deals with different ways people handle grief. It’s an interesting – and extremely scary and gory – story, but it’s also extremely well told and well filmed.

SMGMT Lungz and Junior2Sav Release FEELINGS GET HURT prod. by JJRemix

After touching down in North West Arkansas (NWA,) Hafa Adai Media/ Signature Management music artist Lungz swiftly networked to find local creatives that would be interested in exploring opportunities with Lungz (aka HighwayDj JB Joogen the Mixtape Merc) in the independent music entertainment field.

Knowing that this region of Arkansas has major room for improvement in developing an actual Hip Hop scene only inspired Lungz even more, yet acquiring the talent and engineering skills of Junior2Sav from bEAtZwRAp Soundlab was an unforeseen blessing that caught Lungz by surprise.

“I knew I could find artists to develop but discovering Junior’s work on social media was a total win,” said Lungz, “…Junior already has a loyal following, talent and work ethic to back it.”

Lungz continued, “I had this concept custom beat by JJRemix with a Paul Wall sample that was banging like King Kong in the mother fu**in trunk. I knew Junior2Sav would be the perfect feature artist for the record and he had the most legit studio in the area as well. It was inevitable that we would create something NWA has never heard before locally.”

Experience what the hype is all about.

“FEELINGS GET HURT” will be available on all streaming platforms August 20, 2021. Be amongst the first to experience this highly enjoyable southern rap banger FIRST here on YT.

Visuals by MaxMillyArtworks

The Wanderers Film Review By Bri Lamontagne

The Wanderers is quite an ambitious film. It touches on a wide variety of themes, considering it’s a product of the film-making, writing, and acting techniques of the late 1970’s and the setting was the late 1960’s. While the effects are more common to B movies of this time period, the concepts and themes it attempts to shed light on – realistic, humanitarian themes – are more common in Blockbuster films such as musicals with the same general time period setting (West Side Story, Hairspray, Grease) and well-beloved cultural classics like Dirty Dancing and Back to the Future. The soundtrack even fits with these, with many of the same songs as on the Dirty Dancing soundtrack (though, this movie came first) – and if I do say so myself, it’s a pretty kickin’ soundtrack!

There are multiple gangs featured in this film, the main characters mainly belonging to The Wanderers. The Wanderers are the mostly-Italian-American youth gang. “The Baldies” (named so for the way their heads are shaved) are a more inclusive society, but considered the “toughest” youth gang, and they tend to wear leather jackets – much like the “Greasers” in Grease. There’s an unnamed gang of People of Color youth and another one made up of Asian students, run by Teddy Wong. The biggest issues at the start of the film are really between The Wanderers and the POC youth gangs because they attend school together in a relatively recently desegregated urban school environment. However, there is also another gang called “The Ducky Boys”, (“ducky” may be a derogatory term I’m unaware of for Eastern European immigrants), which I believe is made up of people who are supposed to be Eastern European in ancestry. “The Baldies” seem to be a bit older and don’t seem to attend school with the other gangs. The Asian gang sets itself up as an unbiased group that won’t take sides in a rumble until they deem it necessary. “The Ducky Boys” are set up through film effects, including background music and mist, as the “scariest” and “creepiest” gang, and end up being the major villains of the film. I believe this was done as a plot device to bring the POC and The Wanderers gangs together against a common foe, since the rest of the gangs are represented in a more realistic light throughout the film.

Meanwhile, the film also deals with the teenage lives of these characters in a realistic, if melodramatic, manner. We see their dramas, betrayals, sex and teen pregnancy, drinking, and military recruitment, as well as minor and major tragedies. Considering everything the movie attempts to cover, they are tied together relatively well. Though subtle, I do believe it also begins to deal with issues of belonging and teen sexuality, including some characters who may or may not be gay due to how they behave throughout the film. Not to mention the focus on Joey’s dysfunctional and abusive family life, Despie’s father and his organized-crime-like behavior (bribery, gambling, violence at a bowling alley, etc), and the teacher who works to get the Italian and “colored” kids to understand cultural differences and the concept of brotherhood between races and ethnicity.

The film has an upbeat and comic ending involving an inclusive set singing “I’m A Wanderer” by the Beach Boys and two of the main characters driving away into the night, leaving the state with comedic dialogue. Considering the time period it was made and all of the issues that it touched on, The Wanderers is a well-made film. It might even deserve to be considered an A- Movie.

Lost Highway movie review By DJ Bri

Lost Highway is a film directed by David Lynch released in 1997. It stars Bill Pullman and Patricia Arquette, but features many other famous actors such as Gary Busey and Richard Pryor. The genre is considered to be mystery thriller, but also somewhere between psychological suspense and speculative or surrealist fiction. This film raises more questions than it answers.

To start, it’s certainly not a film fit for children or people with epilepsy. I say that last piece because there’s a jazz concert scene close to the beginning of the film that involves a heavy and erratic use of strobe lights. It’s also artistic in the French sense – there are several sex scenes with almost full nudity, at least on the woman’s part, which may also relate to the connection with porn. As the film continues, the death scenes become increasingly gory – or, should I say, the gore is shown more explicitly. However, the creepiest parts of the film were the psychological suspense aspects, especially the scenes occurring at nighttime. Personally, I was glad it was sunny outside my window because this film is definitely a mind-bender.

It’s clear to see from the beginning of the film that Pullman’s character already has some weird PTSD issues, which doesn’t make sense until the very end of the film. Since it’s an older film, the speaking tracks are much softer than the music tracks. I suggest turning up the volume before it starts so you don’t miss any important dialogue.

There are so many questions about the reasons for the concept of the “lost highway” that crossed my mind while watching the film, but none are conclusively answered.

Was the film an attempt at portraying women as evil for enjoying sex or for punishing women for enjoying public sex/being porn stars, even when forced into the role? Is the loop aspect of it a metaphor for Hell? Does the film intend to show porn and the porn industry as an evil and corrupting influence?

The most pervasive questions were these: who is the “mystery man” (as that is his character name according to IMDB)? How does he know these people or how is he involved with them? Who invited him in? How? When?

The ending is non-conclusive in a way worse than Inception. Many questions are left unanswered (some may seem like spoilers, if you haven’t watched the film). Who or what is the “mystery man”, other than perhaps a metaphor for evil or the capacity for murder? Is the film a time loop Twilight Zone-style, or is it a memory-filled loop that could stand as a metaphor for Hell or the battle of the conscience? How is the protagonist two people at once in either scenario, unless this is a metaphor for an identity disorder? Was Renee Madison truly killed at the beginning, and therefore Alice Walker was a figment of the kid’s imagination? Or was she alive the whole time, in which case, where does she disappear to at the very end of the film, and how did she fake her death so well at the beginning? Are Renee and the “mystery man” one and the same? That might explain how the “mystery man” was “invited” in to Fred Madison (Bill Pullman)’s life.

The only thing that would make sense to me is if the entire film is a metaphor for how memory never truly keeps track of events as they happened and in fact the story is an amalgamation of events in Fred Madison’s life before Prison and he’s going crazy trying to figure out what happened.

It’s clear to see from the beginning of the film that Pullman’s character already has some weird PTSD issues, which doesn’t make sense until the very end of the film. Since it’s an older film, the speaking tracks are much softer than the music tracks, so I suggest turning up the volume before it starts so you don’t miss any important dialogue.

There are so many questions about the reasons for the concept of the “lost highway” that crossed my mind while watching the film, but none are conclusively answered.

Was the film an attempt at portraying women as evil for enjoying sex? Or for punishing women for enjoying public sex/being porn star, even when forced into the role? Is the loop aspect of it a metaphor for Hell? Does the film intend to show porn and the porn industry as an evil and corrupting influence?

The most pervasive questions were these: who is the “mystery man” (as that is his character name according to IMDB)? How does he know these people or how is he involved with them? Who invited him in? How? When?

The ending is non-conclusive in a way worse than Inception. Many questions are left unanswered (some may seem like spoilers, if you haven’t watched the film). Who or what is the “mystery man”, other than perhaps a metaphor for evil or the capacity for murder? Is the film a time loop Twilight Zone-style, or is it a memory-filled loop that could stand as a metaphor for Hell or the battle of the conscience? How is the protagonist two people at once in either scenario, unless this is a metaphor for an identity disorder? Was Renee Madison truly killed at the beginning, and therefore Alice Walker was a figment of the kid’s imagination? Or was she alive the whole time, in which case, where does she disappear to at the very end of the film, and how did she fake her death so well at the beginning? Are Renee and the “mystery man” one and the same? That might explain how the “mystery man” was “invited” in to Fred Madison (Bill Pullman)’s life.

The only thing that would make sense to me is if the entire film is a metaphor for how memory never truly keeps track of events as they happened and in fact the story is an amalgamation of events in Fred Madison’s life before Prison and he’s going crazy trying to figure out what happened.